JLA Update June 21

— Written By

The majority of peanut fields in the V-C region have adequate stands with peanuts experiencing minimal stress. Although some areas of the region have had limited rainfall during the past two weeks, peanut at this stage of development are not experiencing stress that would limit yield. Although days have been relatively hot, temperatures have not reached levels that would be damaging to pollination.

Thrips pressure remains relatively high but growers have been successful at suppressing these populations and minimizing injury to plants (Image 1). Although some injury was noted from herbicides applied at planting in a few fields, peanuts have recovered well. Weed control in most fields is considered adequate but growers will be applying herbicides over the next 3 to 4 weeks to ensure a weed-free crop throughout the season (Image 2).

In the V-C region where the primary market type is the Virginia market type, growers will be applying gypsum over the next two weeks and have already begun doing so. Additional field operations in the next two weeks will include application of insecticide to control southern corn rootworm based on risk of injury from this pest.

Peanut in many fields have begun flowering, especially those peanuts planted in early May (Images 3 and 4). Later planted peanuts are also doing well and will begin flowering in the coming two weeks (Images 5, 6, 7). In addition to adequate stands in most fields, root systems are being formed with adequate nodulation in most cases (Image 8). Growers will begin developing strategies to control foliar and soil-borne disease. The majority of fungicide applications will be made in early July when peanut are in the R3 stage of growth.

While growers are minimally concerned about spider mites at the current time, dry weather over the coming few weeks in some areas of the region could promote this pest. Growers with irrigation capacity will begin irrigating in a few weeks when peanut begin pegging. Acreage estimates for the entire V-C stand at 190,000 acres (77,000 hectares). More detailed information on plantings will be provided as soon as information comes available. Average yield potential is estimated at approximately 3,900 pounds per acre.

Peanut recovering from early season thrips injury

Image 1. Peanut recovering from early season thrips injury.

Weeds being controlled in peanut.

Image 2. Weeds being controlled in peanut.

Peanut planted in early May under irrigation.

Image 3. Peanut planted in early May under irrigation.

Flowering of peanut planted in early May under irrigation.

Image 4. Flowering of peanut planted in early May under irrigation.

Peanut planted May 2 under dryland production.

Image 5. Peanut planted May 2 under dryland production.

Peanut planted May 19 under dryland production.

Image 6. Peanut planted May 19 under dryland production.

Peanut planted May 30 under dryland production.

Image 7. Image 7. Peanut planted May 30 under dryland production.

Peanut root system with adequate early season nodulation for nitrogen fixation.

Image 8. Peanut root system with adequate early season nodulation for nitrogen fixation.

Article first appeared as North Carolina Peanut Note (PNNC-2014-077)