Update on Injured Peanuts

— Written By

Just talked with this farmer and after sending in a soil sample he found out the pH was around 4.2. The question is what should he do now. He has already invested most of his planting and pest management costs and has fungicide sprays remaining along with gypsum, digging and harvest costs. For now, he is going to apply lime. It is unlikely this will help a great deal for this year’s crop but it just might help a little. He is also going to apply about 300 pounds of ammonium sulfate. Low pH is rough on legumes and nitrogen fixation so supplying nitrogen should help the peanuts in the better areas for sure and even the really sick areas. We discussed knifing in the nitrogen but I just don’t think the roots will get to the nitrogen streak in some areas. If the peanuts improve he will come back with more ammonium sulfate in mid-August. Both gypsum and ammonium sulfate can lower pH in a transient manner, so there is some concern about this. He is holding off on the gypsum until later, if at all (see Table 3-15 for an idea of what gypsum can do at low pH.) But this is an extremely low pH so those data may not hold. Best case is probably 60% of the projected yield (see Table 3-13). He is an excellent farmer so he might have averaged 5000 pounds, so 3000 pounds might be the best he can do but maybe higher given he has done over 6000 pounds at times in some fields. The farmer ran rows perpindicular to his the year prior in tobacco (a different farmer) and that pattern was beginning to be evident about 3 weeks ago. 

I will keep you posted on how things improve (for those interested.) 

These images were provided by a farmer. The injury appears to be from a PPO herbicide. Based on spray patterns the injury was specific to this field as the farmer planted and sprayed peanut with the same load in other fields and those peanuts look much better. Tobacco was grown in 2013. Whether or not this is Spartan carryover or excessive injury from Valor SX is an unknown. Peanuts in the other fields, where the farmer used a 2 oz/acre rate of Vaor SX, look good. Spartan Charge is labeled for peanut, so if this was a problem the rate must have been really high in tobacco. There appeared to be a pattern going across the peanut rows and may have been associated with tobacco. But this too is unknown. The peanuts have recovered a great deal and most likely will yield relatively well. There could be something else going on but nothing stands out to me.

Just talked with this farmer and after sending in a soil sample he found out the pH was around 4.2. The question is what should he do now. He has already invested most of his planting and pest management costs and has fungicide sprays remaining along with gypsum, digging and harvest costs. For now, he is going to apply lime. It is unlikely this will help a great deal for this year’s crop but it just might help a little. He is also going to apply about 300 pounds of ammonium sulfate. Low pH is rough on legumes and nitrogen fixation so supplying nitrogen should help the peanuts in the better areas for sure and even the really sick areas. We discussed knifing in the nitrogen but I just don’t think the roots will get to the nitrogen streak in some areas. If the peanuts improve he will come back with more ammonium sulfate in mid-August. Both gypsum and ammonium sulfate can lower pH in a transient manner, so there is some concern about this. He is holding off on the gypsum until later, if at all (see Table 3-15 for an idea of what gypsum can do at low pH.) But this is an extremely low pH so those data may not hold. Best case is probably 60% of the projected yield (see Table 3-13). He is an excellent farmer so he might have averaged 5000 pounds, so 3000 pounds might be the best he can do but maybe higher given he has done over 6000 pounds at times in some fields. The farmer ran rows perpindicular to his the year prior in tobacco (a different farmer) and that pattern was beginning to be evident about 3 weeks ago.
I will keep you posted on how things improve (for those interested.)
These images were provided by a farmer. The injury appears to be from a PPO herbicide. Based on spray patterns the injury was specific to this field as the farmer planted and sprayed peanut with the same load in other fields and those peanuts look much better. Tobacco was grown in 2013. Whether or not this is Spartan carryover or excessive injury from Valor SX is an unknown. Peanuts in the other fields, where the farmer used a 2 oz/acre rate of Vaor SX, look good. Spartan Charge is labeled for peanut, so if this was a problem the rate must have been really high in tobacco. There appeared to be a pattern going across the peanut rows and may have been associated with tobacco. But this too is unknown. The peanuts have recovered a great deal and most likely will yield relatively well. There could be something else going on but nothing stands out to me.

germinating peanuts

peanut field

peanut field

Article first appeared as North Carolina Peanut Note (PNNC-2014-083)