JLA Report August 5, 2014

— Written By

The peanut crop in the V-C region continues to progress nicely moving into August. In most cases rainfall has been adequate to move the crop forward and in some cases with recent weather patterns rainfall has been excessive (image 1). However, some areas of the lower southeastern portion of the V-C region continue to need rain. With the exception of disease management efforts, occasional outbreaks of worm complexes, and scattered weed escapes, the peanut crop is in excellent shape. Adequate rainfall and moderate temperatures as a rule have contributed to adequate vegetative growth and good pod set and continued maturation of pods (images 2-12). In some cases excessive vegetative growth has been noted and a considerable number of growers have applied the plant growth regulator Apogee to manage growth (images 13, 14). Some disease has been noted in the peanut canopy (images 15) although the vast majority of peanut vines are in excellent shape. Occasional weed escapes have been observed (images 16).

There are approximately 6 to 8 weeks remaining for the 2014 peanut crop in the V-C region. Peanut in the V-C region continue to be poised to yield well should weather conditions remain favorable for continued pod maturation and for digging and harvesting operations. As stated in previous reports, with a crop like peanuts that requires the two-step process of digging and combining, a great deal can go wrong in a short period of time. However, going into August great potential exists for a high-yielding and good grading crop of peanuts. Acreage projection is 200,000 acres or 81,000 hectares in the region (slightly higher than previous projections). Average yield potential is estimated at approximately 4,000 pounds per acre, slightly higher than previous projections.

Water standing in peanut fields after excessive rain

Image 1. Water standing in peanut fields after excessive rain on August 3.

distribution of peanut pods

Image 2. Example of distribution of peanut pods on August 3.

peanut canopy in early August

Image 3. Peanut planted May 2 and image recorded August 3.

peanut plant showing early pod development

Image 4. Reproductive development of peanut planted May 2 and image recorded August 3.

pod development on a peanut plant

Image 5. Pod development of peanut planted May 2 with image recorded August 3.

peanut canopy in early August

Image 6. Peanut planted May 16 and image recorded August 3.

pod development on a peanut plant

Image 7. Reproductive development of peanut planted May 16 with image recorded August 3.

pod development

Image 8. Pod development in peanut planted May 16 with image recorded August 3.

peanut canopy in early August

Image 9. Peanut planted May 28 with image recorded August 3.

pod development in peanut

Image 10. Reproductive development of peanut planted May 28 with image recorded August 3.

pod development

Image 11. Pod development of peanut planted May 28 with image recorded August 3.

kernal development

Image 12. Development of the most mature kernels on August 3 from peanut planted May 2, 16 and 28 planting dates (May 2 kernel is on the left).

peanut canopy showing treated and untreated rows

Image 13. Peanut canopy following first application of Apogee (Apogee applied on rows on left with non-treated peanut on right.)

peanut canopy showing treated and untreated rows

Image 14. Peanut treated with Apogee on the left versus non-treated peanut on right.

diseased peanut canopy

Image 15. Disease in the peanut canopy on August 3.

Article first appeared as North Carolina Peanut Note (PNNC-2014-116)