Data on Salvage Spray Programs

— Written By

Defoliation at digging (percent)

Pod yield (pounds per acre)

Year

No salvage

Salvage

No salvage

Salvage

2005

45

27*

2610

2390

2006

41

38*

3330

2880*

2008

37

44

4270

4380

2010

34

21*

2570

2660

2011

31

20

3880

5030*

2012

30

22

4440

4510

Salvage spray was Headline (6 oz/acre) plus chlorothalonil (16 oz/acre) applied in mid-September following programs with either no sprays during the season, two sprays early or 5 sprays. These peanuts were dug in mid-October. Note that yield increased once with the salvage spray, decreased once (I suspect due to Sclerotinia blight increasing with chlorothalonil), and not being affected in 4 instances. These data are pooled over the normal spray programs but there was not an interaction of spray program and salvage treatment (yes or no.) When averaged over salvage sprays, the amount of defoliation without normal spray earlier in the season was 56%, with 2 sprays it was 40% and with the 5-spray program there was only 4% defoliation. Still unsure of the real take home message other than yield won’t be affected most of the time with the salvage spray (even with a fair amount of defoliation, moderate amount of defoliation or essentially no defoliation when fungicides are applied as a salvage treatment.) Also, presence of Sclerotinia blight makes the salvage spray with chlorothalonil risky. The variety was Gregory, so that limits the utility of data for decisions on current production practices.

Barbara and I are pulling together a more complete paper on these trials. It was a little complicated. In addition to the normal sprays and salvage sprays there were 3 digging dates.

Article first appeared as North Carolina Peanut Note (PNNC-2015-139)