Crop Report May 28, 2015

— Written By

Planting of the peanut crop in the V-C region of the US is 95% complete (Figure 1). In most cases plant stands very good (Figure 2) with only occasional fields with low populations (Figure 3). With the exception of some thrips injury (Figure 4) and minor injury from insecticide (Figure 5) the peanut crop is off to a very good start in the region. Farmers are beginning to apply postemergence herbicides to control weed escapes (Figure 6) and as injury from thrips becomes more apparent many growers will begin applying acephate. Weather has been good for peanut to emerge (Figure 7) and grow relatively well during the month of May. Rainfall and soil moisture have been adequate in most places to establish adequate stands of peanuts. Rainfall has not been abundant, however, and this may cause preemergence herbicides to perform less effectively than in 2014 and will require timely postemergence applications of herbicides to maintain weed-free fields.

Estimates from NASS remain the same with acreage in North and South Carolina at 94,000 (38,000 ha) and 115,000 (46,500 ha), respectively, and 20,000 (8,100 ha) in Virginia. The total acreage for the V-C region in 2015 is projected to be 229,000 acres (92,600 ha). The yield estimate for the region remains at 4,000 pounds/acre (4,480 kg/ha).

Peanut seed and inoculant containing Bradyrhizobia for biological nitrogen fixation in peanut.

Figure 1. Peanut seed and inoculant containing Bradyrhizobia for biological nitrogen fixation in peanut.

Field receiving metam sodium for CBR control during the bedding process.

Figure 2. Adequate peanut stand in late May 2015.

Low peanut population requiring a second planting of his field.

Figure 3. Low peanut population requiring a second planting of his field.

Thrips injury on peanut 3 weeks after planting.

Figure 4. Thrips injury 3 weeks after planting.

Relatively minor injury from the insecticide phorate on lower leaves of peanut canopy.

Figure 5. Relatively minor injury from the insecticide phorate on lower leaves of peanut canopy.

Weeds escaping preplant and preemergence herbicides.

Figure 6. Weeds escaping preplant and preemergence herbicides.

Peanut emerging from planting in mid-May.

Figure 7. Peanut emerging from planting in mid-May.

Article first appeared as North Carolina Peanut Note (PNNC-2015-43)