JLA Report – 6-11-16

— Written By

Planting of the peanut crop in the V-C region is complete and the vast majority of fields have adequate stands to optimize yield if environmental conditions remain favorable and farmers can employ key production and pest management practices in a timely manner. Most peanuts have been protected from thrips injury (Figure 1) either through in-furrow granular or liquid products applied in the seed furrow at planting or with timely applications of foliar sprays. Peanuts are beginning to grow rapidly and in most cases will outgrow additional thrips feeding. Weed control has been a challenge in some areas because of the timing of rainfall relative to planting and application of preemergence herbicides. However, growers have had good conditions to control escaped weeds (Figure 2). In just a few instances problems have been associated with delayed growth or injury to seedlings (Figure 3) but these fields are only being observed on a very small percentage of total plantings and in almost all relatively small areas of fields. Growers will be applying gypsum in the next few weeks and considering if insecticide for rootworms is needed. Fungicide sprays will not be needed for another 30 days for most fields in the V-C region. Relative growth from plantings of peanut in early, mid- and late-May are provided in Figures 4-6.

The peanut crop is off to an excellent start and rainfall over the past two weeks has been more than adequate for potential of having an excellent peanut crop. There are many environmental and management criteria that will ultimately impact yield and quality, but at this point in season the peanut crop has great potential. Estimates remain the same for plantings at 230,000 acres (93,000 ha) for the V-C region. Yield estimate for the region remains at 4,000 pounds/acre (4,480 kg/ha).

Note from Rick Brandenburg, June 12: Our counts indicate that thrips numbers are indeed starting to decline. We should be good from this point forward in most fields.

Click on the images to view full size. 

peanut plants recovering from early season thrips injury

Figure 1. Peanut recovering from early season thrips injury.

Figure 2. Weeds controlled by foliar applied herbicides.

Figure 2. Weeds controlled by foliar applied herbicides.

Figure 3. Seedling injury from early season stress

Figure 3. Seedling injury from early season stress

Figure 4. Peanut planted May 5 with image recorded June 5.

Figure 4. Peanut planted May 5 with image recorded June 5.

Figure 5. Peanut planted May 18 with image recorded June 5.

Figure 5. Peanut planted May 18 with image recorded June 5.

Figure 6. Peanut planted May 27 with image recorded June 5.

Figure 6. Peanut planted May 27 with image recorded June 5.

Article first appeared as North Carolina Peanut Note (PNNC-2015-054)