Injury From Tank Mixture Peanut Notes No. 197 2021

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The following information is related to complicated tank mixtures.

There are a lot mixtures being applied to peanuts. A week ago I put out the following mixtures and looked at injury this week.

1) Apogee (7.2 oz) plus crop oil concentrate (32 oz) plus UAN (16 oz)

Versus

2) Apogee (7.2 oz) plus crop oil concentrate (32 oz) plus UAN (16 oz) PLUS Butyrac 200 at 16 oz, Clethodim at 16 oz, Intrepid Edge at 8 oz, Miravis at 3.4 oz, and Elatus at 9.4 oz.

I don’t think that level of injury will be yield limiting but it does get your attention. I’ll keep looking to see if the Apogee performed like normal and we will record yield.

Over the years we have done a great deal of tank mix research and looked at many combinations. But it always seems like I never have a direct answer for many of the questions. It is in part due to the fact that there are so many possibilities and it is really hard to set up a trial that has all the combinations and the control treatments to make sure we can assign the potential problem to a single component. For example, treatment 2 above had injury but I don’t know which product really caused it or whether it was the combination of 2, 3, or 4 of the components. It’s just scientifically challenging to parse out the culprit to a complicated mix (and then weather and water quality can play a role – this mix was put out on a really hot and humid afternoon, around 2 p.m., in August.)

I like to do this type of research, and when my dad and uncle had a few peanuts at home, I would look at some of the mixes in small plots. My dad would say, “Oh, you’re going to play with your chemistry set today.” Not sure what Mr. Gil Burroughs, my high school chemistry and physics teacher would think about this type of work.

We will keep looking at key mixtures and try to give you an informed answer when the questions arise.

Apogee

Apogee (7.2 oz) plus crop oil concentrate (32 oz) plus UAN (16 oz)

Apogee in field

Apogee (7.2 oz) plus crop oil concentrate (32 oz) plus UAN (16 oz) PLUS
Butyrac 200 at 16 oz, Clethodim at 16 oz, Intrepid Edge at 8 oz, Miravis at 3.4 oz,
Elatus at 9.4 oz

brown spots